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Emotional Abuse Enthusiast Angelina Jolie VS. Vanity Fair

The third world's very own Baby Jane, Angelina Jolie, recently came under fire for her casting techniques leading up to the filming of First They Killed My Father, as detailed by writer Evgenia Peretz in Vanity Fair. They involve a potentially emotionally abusive game testing the emotional range of impoverished Cambodian children in consideration for the lead role. Those not chosen were swiftly shuttled back to the sweat shop to craft Jolie's red carpet look for the premiere.

Jolie's lawyers clapped back at the h8ers, demanding that her words during the interview were taken out of context. Jolie only sanctions the good type of emotional abuse. Now the transcript from the tête-à-tête is out, and it proves without a doubt that Jolie is the modern-day Cruella Devill, except her adventure will be titled 101 Brown Children.

In order to cast the lead in what is sure to be some vanity project abortion exploiting the tragedy of others - all directors need their trademarks - Jolie's crew developed a game not under the Milton Bradley umbrella of family fun:

To cast the children in the film, Jolie looked at orphanages, circuses, and slum schools, specifically seeking children who had experienced hardship. In order to find their lead, to play young Loung Ung, the casting directors set up a game, rather disturbing in its realism: they put money on the table and asked the child to think of something she needed the money for, and then to snatch it away. The director would pretend to catch the child, and the child would have to come up with a lie. ‘Srey Moch [the girl ultimately chosen for the part] was the only child that stared at the money for a very, very long time,’ Jolie says. ‘When she was forced to give it back, she became overwhelmed with emotion. All these different things came flooding back.’ Jolie then tears up. ‘When she was asked later what the money was for, she said her grandfather had died, and they didn’t have enough money for a nice funeral.

Lawyers were on Vanity Fair like Jolie on a marginalized child, and asked the magazine to feature clarifying statements absolving the cast and crew of any wrongdoing. But the peeps at Vanity Fair came into this thing with their dicks swinging. In a welcomed turn of events, Vanity Fair released the actual transcript of the interview to do a double clap back:

AJ: But it was very hard to find a little Loung. And so it was what they call a slum school. I don’t think that’s a very nice word for it, but a school for kids in very poor areas.

And I think, I mean they didn’t know. We just went in and—you just go in and do some auditions with the kids. And it’s not really an audition with children. We had this game where it would be—and I wasn’t there and they didn’t know what they were really doing. They kind of said, “Oh, a camera’s coming up and we want to play a game with you.” And the game for that character was “We’re going to put some money on the table. Think of something that you need that money for.” Sometimes it was money, sometimes it was a cookie. [Laughter] “And then take it.” And then we would catch them. “We’re going to catch you, and we’d like you to try to lie that you didn’t have it.”

So it was very interesting seeing the kids and how they would—some were very conscious of the camera. They were actually—there are so many talented kids in this country. But Srey Moch was the only child that stared at that money for a very, very long time before she picked it up, and then bravely, brazenly lying, like was trying to hide, but then she also kind of—

EP: Wait. This is the girl, Loung.

AJ: This is the girl. And then when she was forced to give it back became very kind of like strong, emotional, she became overwhelmed with emotion that she was—and she just—all of these different things flooded out. And I don’t think she or her family would mind me saying when she was later asked what that money was for, she said her grandfather died and they didn’t have enough money for a nice funeral.

Surprising none of her family members like her. Seems like a charmer. Details surrounding Judy Garland's abuse during The Wizard of Oz are widely shared and can still punch up a dinner conversation like nothing else. Director Victor Fleming slapped the fuck out of Garland to get her to stop laughing and the Munchkins sexually molested her. We represent... the child rapists. But even with these and other dark details of Hollywood's past clouding movie trivia night, freakishly rich, famous, and stage four delusional celebrities like Jolie are incapable of understanding when they're the culprits. Angelina Jolie could be riding a wheezing orca around her living room while watching Blackfish and think "Those poor creatures."

 

Photo Credit: Vanity Fair

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